logo
info@cambridgevascularaccess.com
HomeThe ProceduresYour QuestionsYour DoctorFeesContact

Doctor and patient

image two

YOUR QUESTIONS

WHAT SORT OF CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETER IS BEST FOR ME?

The type of catheter that is best for you will depend on your underlying condition, the type of treatment that you are having, and how long you are having your treatment for. The various options will be discussed with you to help you make a decision.


HOW LONG DOES THE OPERATION TAKE?

It usually takes 15 - 60 minutes to put a central line in and this is normally done as a day case in hospital.


WILL I NEED A GENERAL ANAESTHETIC?

I normally do the operations under local anaesthetic and sedation; you should not need a general anaesthetic. You will be able to have a light breakfast on the morning of your operation.


HOW DO I LOOK AFTER MY CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETER?

You will need to look after your line; after all it is very precious!  But do not worry, it is fairly simple.  We will give you lots of support and help. You will find some more information under the specific procedures.

 

ARE THERE ANY POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS?

Having a central venous catheter is a fairly common procedure and is usually fairly straightforward. However, along with everything in medicine there are potential problems and complications.


Swelling/bruising/pain

 

You may have some swelling and bruising after the procedure and this may take a few weeks to completely settle down.  If you are uncomfortable then simple pain killers such as paracetamol should help.  Occasionally you may have some pins and needles in your arm after the procedure, this should settle within 24 hours.

 

Infection

 

It is possible for an infection to develop either inside the central line, around the exit site or port, or in the bloodstream. You should contact your doctor or nurse if:

 

  • the exit site becomes red or swollen
  • you notice discoloured fluid coming from it          
  • you develop a temperature, shivers or shakes, or generally feel unwell.

You may be given antibiotics, and if the infection is serious, the line may have to be removed. The risk of infection can be reduced by making sure that whenever anyone uses your line they wash their hands and use a sterile technique.

 

Clots

 

It is possible for a blood clot (thrombosis) to form in your vein around the line. Often these are mild and cause no problems; however, if the clot is large it may cause symptoms such as swelling of the arms or face, or shortness of breath.  If this does happen it is important that you contact your doctor or nurse.  If a clot does form the line may have to be removed and you may also be given daily injections to help dissolve the clot.

 

Stenosis

 

Sometimes the vein around the line can narrow (stenose).  This should not cause too many problems initially but it may make it difficult to insert lines in the future.

 

Pneumothorax

 

Very rarely the lung can collapse when the line is being inserted (a pneumothorax) - this is a very rare complication because of the way I insert the lines under ultrasound control.  If it does happen then it normally settles on its own; occasionally a small drain has to be put into the chest cavity for a few days to help the lung re-expand.

 

Malposition

 

I will leave the end of your line in a good position but occasionally the tip can move about.  If this happens you may need another operation to reposition the line. Very rarely the tip of the catheter can work its way through the wall of the vein or the heart; this can be very serious but is fortunately extremely rare.

 

Line blockages

 

It is important that your line is flushed regularly to prevent a blockage of the line. Unfortunately blockages can occur despite this. Sometimes these blockages can be treated using small doses of 'clot busting' drugs but occasionally the line has to be changed.